The Modern Workforce

Work Evolving

The Changing Worker Experience

Increasing Diversity

Increasing Diversity
Globalization and demographic trends are increasing workforce diversity.

Changing Skill Sets

People in office
Stronger emphasis on adaptability, social and technical skills.

Person-Centric Outcomes

Person Meditating
Greater attention to worker engagement, health, and well-being.
The changing mix of workers and job demands raise new questions about how working provides people with a sense of fulfillment, opportunity, and well-being.   At the same time, there is increasing interest in the role of alternative work arrangements and career sequencing on workers’ sense of inclusion and work identity.  The Center is interested in encouraging basic and applied research on these and related worker issues, including for example:
  1. The influence of job insecurity and temporary work on work identity.
  2. The psychological resources and strategies that promote healthy work in non-career jobs.
  3. The workplace ecologies that promote feelings of inclusion and engagement.  

Related Content


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